Wizard World Chicago

Wizard World Chicago

Spectacle Publishing at Wizard World Did you see us? We saw you! The Madison Spectacle Publishing team was in Chicago for the 2012 Wizard World event. In addition to great costumes, excellent shopping and junk food galore, the SPMG team talked about their first Role-Playing Game release, The Darkest Age.   “In 1354 the Black Plague killed 25 million people. Then they stood up and fed upon the living.” Written by veteran game designer, Rob Gee and science-fiction fantasy author, Eric Staggs, with art from Jeff Dewitt (among other fantastic illustrators), The Darkest Age is a d20-based role-playing game. The Darkest Age is set in 1345, during the height of the Black Plague. The Darkest Age role-playing game takes the zombie apocalypse into a brilliantly plausible and well-researched alternate history. To learn more about The Darkest Age, check out the website or like it on Facebook. The Names and The Faces Wizard World was packed to bursting with famous folks, icons of nerddom and geekness of unrivaled proportion. The Spectacle Publishing team got their pictures taken with the beautiful Cindy Morgan of Tron. Not to mention meeting the great Clyde Caldwell and a slew of other talented artists too numerous to name. But take heart, they’ve been “liked” on our Facebook page. Missed Spectacle at Wizard World? That’s too bad, but you’ll have another chance. The Spectacle Publishing team located in Madison Wisconsin will be at WisCon 2013. Never been to WisCon? Check it out! It’s the nation’s first Feminist Science-Fiction and Fantasy convention. We’ll be there showcasing books from our up and coming female authors, Alethea Eason (The Heron’s Path), Ashleigh Gavin (Birth by Fire’s Embrace) and of course we’ll have copies of The Darkest Age. See you there!     Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

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2b or Not 2b: The Poetry of Numbers

2b or Not 2b: The Poetry of Numbers

That’s right, folks. We are heralding our newest addition to the Spectacle family with a truly imaginative oddball: “Poetry for Engineers.” Each page meticulously written out on a typewriter and then scanned into digital format, engineer/author Clayton T. Grow, P.E. creates a masterful book of mathematical art. The combination of his quaint, sometimes white-out corrected pages and the precision of his wordsmithing create a delightful work that will engage the left brained and right brained alike. Written with an eye towards engineers, mathematicians and other logic-oriented experts, Mr. Grow is able to forge poetry that bridges the communication barrier to appeal to number wizards and the non-mathematical, alike. A truly captivating book, “Poetry for Engineers” is a must-have for every lover of poetry. For more information on Mr. Grow, check out his blogs: The Writing Engineer Poet for Hire Welcome to Clay Town Also, be sure to check back soon for a link to “Poetry for Engineers.” You won’t want to miss out! Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

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Heron’s Path by Alethea Eason: (sample)

Check out this sample from the upcoming young adult fantasy novel Heron’s Path by Alethea Eason: — — — On a hot day in September I found Celeste’s clothes scattered all over the barn, one shoe upside down next to Papa’s forge and the other inside a milking pail. Her yellow dress hung from a ladder like a bird suspended in midair. I pulled the dress down by its hem and three tiny blue feathers, nearly the same shade as my sister’s eyes, drifted down to the dusty floor. I caught one of them in my hand; I stood there puzzling over what might have happened that morning to make her run off again. I felt alone, as though a wind had come up and peeled Celeste from the earth. I told myself that she was playing the same old game she’d scared us with so many other times, but this loneliness—so odd and new—followed me like a ghost as I ran outside and shouted for Papa. I was afraid he wouldn’t come; I’d find our cabin gone, and I’d be without any family at all. Papa searched the woods. I took our dog, Rufus, and ran up and down the river bank. When I found no trace of her I followed Papa into the trees where there were more shadows than seemed right. I didn’t dare go in very far and kept circling the places Celeste and I knew well. I heard Olena’s voice in my head telling me stories. Her words dripping slowly the way honey falls from a spoon. Her stories always made me uneasy. She believed in ghosts, the last traces of the Old Ones, who were a part of the breath and spirit of the rocks and trees, of the river Talum, and the surrounding woods. But the wei-ni-la, the darker ones, were the shadows to really fear. They were ancient too, and lived in the empty spaces of the woods, filling them with whispering. All afternoon Celeste’s name echoed through the trees as Papa and I called for her. Finally, his shouting changed and Rufus started to bark furiously. I was so tired my legs were shaking. I was running on legs that wouldn’t work. When I finally found them, Papa was half way up a steep gully with Celeste draped over his shoulder. Her hair, a skein of golden thread unraveling almost to the ground, was the only thing that covered her. I thought she looked newly born or newly dead. “Is she all right?” I asked. My lips were dry and hurt when I spoke, and my words felt like spittle as they came out of my mouth. All Papa could...

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Spectacle: Who We Are

[youtube:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=simDWTHUZN0&context=C359b4faADOEgsToPDskLPUhmzPBBoUlLpYYRLFBh5] Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

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Why can’t I just publish it myself?

Of course! But at Spectacle, our philosophy is that writers should write. When you self-publish you’ll become your own agent, your own PR specialist, your own marketing team and sometimes even your own graphic designer. We figure you’d rather be writing. At Spectacle, we take all our submissions very seriously. There’s no such thing as a “slush pile” here. No matter what your skill level, we evaluate your manuscript and get back to with a personal note. If we think your piece is really good, we’ll work with you to get it into shape. You want your best work to be out there, to be read and experienced as you meant it to be. A free round of editing is worth it, right? I’ve published books on my own. I know the temptation. Just spell check it and submit it to Amazon/B&N/Whoever. Well, that’s the idea but it never seemed to work like that. The formatting for eBooks is actually a little complicated. This goes back to professionalism – we all want to look like we know what we’re doing. After publishing the books, I posted on Facebook, my blog, a few other places and I saw some sales. Then, with nothing new to say, they became buried in the lists of other self-published eBooks. Don’t get me wrong eBooks are the future. But the traditional publishing industry has given up on editing and personal feedback. Editors don’t edit – they select what is salable. At Spectacle, we actually edit. Trust me, editing is a good thing. Even the best of us tends to get to close to out work, to not see the holes in the plot or the pacing issues. Sometimes a beautifully poignant scene, written as if the muse Calliope herself had channeled through the author takes place in a sensory void – destroying the dream. The author knows the place, but the audience doesn’t. That’s where a good editor comes in. Many authors find that they simply don’t have the time or expertise to effectively market their work. We provide each of our novel authors with a comprehensive marketing package, compiled by professional Internet marketers. Take advantage of that! Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

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