Halloween Catch Up

Some Scary Links BBC: Where Monsters Come From Halloween History Wikipedia: Halloween Another Version of Halloween History Some Scary Books   On Monsters: An Unnatural History of Our Worst Fears I took a class from the author of this book, great professor and a gifted writer. Professor Asma’s insight into the human condition is almost supernatural. As he walks you through the various culturally constructed terrors of modern society, he expertly points out the folly and inconsistencies in each of those superstitions. Malleus Malificarum We’re not going to link to this book since you can get various versions from a dozen sources ranging from free to well past not-free. This is the original Witch Hunter’s Manual, written by a pair of charlatans. Frankenstein Considered a classic of horror literature, one might consider the deeper meanings in this troublesome tale. Is this a Luddite’s warning about science unchecked or a challenge to the existence of God? Literature professors worldwide still waste undergraduate’s time with this heady and unresolvable debate. But if you haven’t read it, you need to. World War Z If you haven’t read this one by now, you need to throw off that rock you’re hiding under and get with the program. This well researched, cleverly constructed historical account of the Zombie Apocalypse is true a modern horror classic. The audio-book version, though abridged, stars the voice talents of Allen Alda, Mark Hamill, Henry Rollins and a whole slew of other professional actors. Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

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Tips for Wary Writers

There’s always a scam. Someone’s always trying to pull something over on someone else. There’s a specialized scam for each industry, for demographic, even writers. On one hand, one thinks, “Wow, this is so elaborate it’s got to be real.” Then you come to your senses.   But if you’re new to an industry, breaking in to writing and publishing for example, you might not know what to look for in a scam. With the Interwebs extending the reach of everyone, making marks and tracks in otherwise unattainable terrain, a writer has to be especially savvy to avoid some of these pitfalls, booby traps and cons.   Here’s a quick list to shuffle through and keep in your back pocket.   Paying to be published This is an absolute scam. If an agent, publisher or any claiming to be affiliated with either asks you for money, it’s a scam. That’s not how it works. You have the talent and the craft. They market it. You both get money. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen this con. “The Literary Society of Peewackanee has chosen YOUR short story for inclusion in their latest anthology. To be included, send $10.00…” Yeah, that’s a scam.   Paying to be entered into contests This is not a scam. It’s crappy and an unnecessary drain on the oft already strained wallets of struggling artists with true talent, but it’s something that is considered legitimate. Entry fees range from $5.00-$50.00 (though I’ve no doubt they go higher), and usually there’s a discount for poetry or multiple submissions. For the record, Spectacle Publishing never charges for entry into their fiction contests. One more thing – I’ve never known anyone who has won one of those contests. I’m just sayin’…   Write your novel in thirty days Thirty days. That’s about 10 pages a day, which seems entirely feasible, until you figure in work, sleep, laundry, showers, bathroom breaks, picking the kids up from school, making (and eating) dinner and all the rest of the things that occupy our days. Recently (actually what inspired this article) I read a post on this very topic from a woman who claims to be able to write a novel in a weekend. For 280 pages in in 48 hours, you’d have to write 10.285 pages per minute. Not eating, sleeping or thinking about plot go without saying. Your book is done when it’s done. There is no other magic book, workshop or course that will get you writing a novel a month. Not unless you’re stealing ideas, rewriting things that have already been written and don’t have a shred of artistic integrity.   Vanity Press The real advantage...

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Online Resources

Litopia You all know about Litopia.com, right? The Writer’s Colony? If not, check it out. NanoWriMo Topping the charts of Awesome this week is the buzz and twitter about National Write A Novel Month. Every november, people from all over the world swear to write  complete novel in one month. Many do… many do not. Which one are you? Preditors & Editors Sort what it sounds like. We can’t decide if that’s good or bad, but fortunately, we don’t have to. Check it out, learn stuff.   101 Tweeps Robert Brewer posted 101 of the best people for writer’s to follow on Twitter. He hasn’t answered our calls about why we’re not listed… Anyway, get your tweet on.   Query Shark One of the biggest problems in our industry is writing a solid query letter. Honestly, most folks don’t know how. No shame, no worries! It’s hard! As well, each editor likes them a little different, so it pays to do some research before you submit your boilerplate query. Query Shark will shape up your queries, if in a rather bloody way. But what do you expect from sharks? Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

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Terror Tips: Writing to frighten

It’s that time of year again… the leaves turn the color of blood and gold; they crisp on the branch, wither and fall to the ground. The nights get longer and the moon takes on a sinister aspect, partly mocking, almost sympathetic to the plight of those bathed in its pale light. It’s the time of year when you start writing horror stories! Spectacle Publishing has put together a short list of articles to get your (heh) blood pumping. The Horror of It All This is a great article by Tim Waggoner. He’s distilled his horror writing tips into three easily digestible chunks, supported by real-world examples you’re very likely to have read or watched. But, I guess, what you can expect from the Horror Writer’s Association. This is the link from which few return! Tips from [Stephen] King Deep in the musty bowels of the NPR archive, there rest the remnants of an interview with Stephen King himself. Included in these interview highlight from Fresh Air, are excerpt from King’s book, On Writing. This is a good stuff, pure distilled King, and straight from the dark place he calls a brain. If you’ve got the guts, click here! Horror: Fiction Factor This online community features weekly articles about writing horror. There’s a wealth of knowledge, experience and opinion here. Plus, the black and red design makes it super-scary! You know what to do! Need some inspiration? Writing Sense has compiled a list of the Top-Ten Horror stories of all time. It’s an impressive list with some heavy hitters listed. Interestingly enough, King, Barker and Koontz do not make the list. Don’t let that stop you. In fact it might be refreshing to skip back a few generations to find out where our current masters of horror fiction found their inspiration. Click here to check it out! Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

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Inspiration

Inspiration comes in many forms to the Writer. The mind of a writer is a cramped place, a barely contained cacophony of images, sights and sounds, ideas and things. But, what happens when the whirlwind stops and the dreams fade to the background and the words… don’t… flow?   A professional writer doesn’t have the luxury of writer’s block. That’s something you throw up when you’re a student and would rather go have a beer or six with friends. If you want to be paid to write, you become an adept in self-entertainment and finding inspiration. Every hour you sit and stare at a screen waiting for inspiration to strike you like lightning is an hour you’re not being paid. You might have better luck waiting for the lightning strike. So go make your own inspiration.   Literary history is littered with a cast of nefarious writer-types of dubious moral standing, plagued by psychological trauma or just plain weird. Learn about them – that maybe inspiration enough right there. A writer like Hunter S. Thompson might wander off after munching some mescaline and try to find a fountain of whiskey, upon discovery declaring it a fountain of youth. That works for him. I don’t recommend it for everyone. In fact, I don’t recommend it at all. Charles Bukowski (a personal favorite) might suggest a trip to the racetrack and a six-pack of watery American beer. Though it’s somewhat safer than the mighty Hunter S. Thompson’s idea of a good time, it’s still probably not for everyone.   I personally like Toy Stores. They’re packed with colors and shapes and sounds, all of it vying for your attention. It’s stuff designed to grab the attention of children with short attention spans. The flood of imagery and marketing and icons and logos will make you wildly agitated and confused. It’s good for you. You can’t help but subconsciously internalize some of the concepts. If a toy store visit doesn’t get your creative juices flowing, you’re not paying attention.   There’s always the bookstore… well, one less bookstore option these days, but there are still some out there. The shelves are backed with words and colors, images – all designed to hook you. Wander through your favorite genre section. See what’s being displayed in the end caps.   Something I think most fiction/creative writing professors would balk at (or at least deny most vehemently) is that you can get a powerful education in writing by listening to music. Perhaps not Lady Gaga, but tick-tock back a few decades and we see some lyrical brilliance, stuff that’s still sloshing around in the cultural consciousness. Though not a huge fan myself, Bob Dylan can...

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2012 – Let the End begin!

We all know it’s not going to happen. We’ve lived through one Rapture, this next supposed Apocalypse might be worthy of opening a bottle of champagne, but not much else. But that doesn’t mean people don’t want to read about it! “End of The World” stories are making their mark as one of the most popular sub-genres of Science Fiction, Horror and even some other less obvious styles. That’s why Spectacle Publishing Media Group LLC is assembling top-notch fiction stories for our upcoming anthology Omega. You got it my friend; this is a flat-out call for submissions! You want to be published! You have a story to tell! We want to publish you! We want to tell your story! Here are the details on what we’re looking for: End of The World, Civilization or Species  stories 2,500 – 10,000 words Strong CHARACTERS Unique Plots (or common plots told in face-melting style) Error FREE, proof read and spell checked submissions For inclusion in this Anthology email submissions@spectaclepmg.com with the subject line “2012 anthology” Short story submissions DO NOT need queries. DO NOT put your story in the body of an email. Attach as a Word doc or RTF file. Deadline for submissions: December 31st, 2011 (however, this date may be changed at our discretion due to scheduling and content needs) By submitting your fiction to SPMG, you are agreeing to allow us to publish in print and eBook format. As always, if you have a longer piece that fits this genre, prepare a query and send it to queries@spectaclepmg.com. Got it? Let’s review: Short Story about the end of the world go to: submissions@spectaclepmg.com (subject line: 2012 Anthology) Do not put your story in the body of an email Longer stories (novels) need a query and they go to: queries@spectaclepmg.com Hurry up! Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

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