What’s new for 2015

What’s new for 2015

What’s new for SPMG in 2015? A whole lot! This is just a hint of what is to come!   Brooklynn’s Bridge by KT Hunter This YA adventure by newcomer KT Hunter is now available through Amazon. Go check it out!   Bride Price by Sean Little This much anticipated eBook will soon be available in print.   Standing In The Wind’s Shadows by Ashleigh Galvin Did you love Birth By Fire’s Embrace? The sequel is almost here. Stay tuned.   Garrett Baldwin – Mister Right In Front Of You He has been working on his rewrites – this is still with him. No updates.   And Yet Love Lives On by John Donahue Look for the collection of inspired short stories by spring!   The Box by Jon Arnts This sci-fi thriller will take you to the edge of the galaxy via the edge of your seat! Stay tuned for more!   Kidtropolis eBook and 2nd Edition by Ray Brown Due to demand, this much loved children’s story is set for release in eBook format and for those who didn’t snatch up a copy before, a second edition of the beautiful print book will be available soon!   The Fate Series – by F. Sharon Swope and Genilee Parente The mother-daughter duo is back with the third and final installment of the Fate series – as well as all new collectors editions for all three books.   Yes. 2015 will be that cool. Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

Read More

Write a Novel in 2014

Write a Novel in 2014

by Alison Lyke I’m going to finish my next novel in 2014. That’s not as much a resolution as a necessity. For one, I promised the good folks at Spectacle PMG at least one more book. I also have this need to write fiction, and to do justice to my characters by seeing their stories through to the end. I won’t presume to tell you how a novel is written, except for word by word, but I will give you some of the techniques that have helped me to reach writing goals and complete my books. Daily Diligence Those of you who “wake up extra early to get writing done,” are maniacs. I can’t even begin to understand you. For everyone else, it may be difficult to fit writing in between work, chores, children, and binge watching Ancient Aliens. I overcome this by making a goal to write a certain amount of words every day, no matter what. Out of optimism, I set this goal at two to three times the amount of words that I know I’ll actually have time to write. Sometimes, I have strings of weeks or months where I can write almost everyday. I often fall off the wagon though and have to rely on other techniques. Carrying Stories My stories are written, either in full or in part, in my mind before they reach the page. I carry them around in my head, nurturing character personalities, filling in plot holes, and adding interesting bits from everyday life. That way, when I do have time to sit down and write, I don’t have to stare at the page and wonder what the hell I’m going to come up with. Fits of Inspiration Something breaks—the fountain of stories in my mind overflows. I have a dream that belongs to my novel. However it happens, inspiration takes over and I have to write and write. I can write chapters in hours. If it was always this easy and I always had time enough to see these fits through, I could finish each book in about two weeks. Inspiration attacks are usually followed by exhaustion and crankiness. Late Night Drinking A few glasses of wine with some friends or a night out at a bar may be followed with writing under the influence. This is great for areas of stories that are weird, otherwise awkward to write, or fantastic. Be prepared to heavily edit any work done using this technique. Deadline Panic I used to have company-imposed deadlines, but I have more freedom in the latest incarnation of my writing life. This means that I have to set my own targets. It’s harder to finish a story on my...

Read More

Wretched Fate Authors Interviewed

Wretched Fate Authors Interviewed

This Mother-Daughter writing duo has released their second with Spectacle Publishing, Wretched Fate. Available in print or eBook format, Wretched Fate is the next installment of the hugely popular Sam Osborne series. Wretched Fate features the return of the much loved Sam Osborne, and introduces a cast of new and intriguing characters. Check out their interview on Conversations With Rich here! Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

Read More

Work-Life (and Writing) Balance

Work-Life (and Writing) Balance

by Yen Ooi Let’s face it. The majority of writers today hold ‘day jobs’ of some sort that brings in money to help them survive. In a recent article in The Guardian (UK)  http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/jan/17/writers-earn-less-than-600-a-year?], we read that writers earn less than £600 a year. That’s atrocious. So, how do writers juggle (paid) work, life, and writing? Firstly, it’s important to realize that writing is work, too, even if it doesn’t pay yet. The great thing is that writing is a passion as well, so it probably doesn’t feel tedious, like other work. Where there is flexibility, judge how you can devote time to both your day job and your writing. Consider how much time you feel is healthy for you to spend working. Forty hours a week? Sixty? Eighty? A hundred? Whatever you decide, test it out and then review it every few months—thinking up a number is very different from working it. Writers are human, and we all need entertainment, rest, and physical activities. Once you’ve decided on a feasible schedule, you just need a little bit of organization and discipline to maintain these hours for your work (including your writing). There is a small exception here. Writing has many phases, and writers tend to think a lot about their writing before they sit down and write. I call this the ‘brewing’ time. Brewing time doesn’t need to be allocated in the hours you set aside. This can happen everywhere, at anytime. So, theoretically, if you decide to work 40 hours a week, and you hold a full-time job that takes up 32 hours a week, you still have 8 hours of physical writing time. This adds up to a full-day’s work, which is plenty. If you hold jobs that are more sporadic in hours, then try and plan a week ahead. Fill in your (paid) work hours, then go in and work out a schedule for writing. Try and keep them to comfortable units of time that are achievable—for example, I like two hour slots. And, if you’re juggling a few writing projects at a time, make sure that you allocate specific projects to your schedule, not just ‘writing.’ Though writing is a passion for most writers, and may not pay yet, we need to treat the process and ourselves with respect. A healthy writer writes best, and maintaining physical and emotional health means balance in your career, your social life, and your creative outlets. And, consider this: if you don’t make time for your social life, then where are you going to get your writing ideas from? Yen Ooi is an author and regular contributor to the Spectacle newsletter. Learn more about her and her work...

Read More

Choosing a Great Title for Your Next Novel

Choosing a Great Title for Your Next Novel

by Ashleigh Galvin If you asked what draws me to a book, like most readers I would answer with the following: a nice cover and a snappy title. A good title is supremely important in making an impression on the reader before they even open the book because it lingers in their mind. If they talk to their friends about the novel, it’s also most likely the first thing they say to introduce the book. Choosing a good title is one of the hardest parts of writing a novel. How can a writer summarise the feeling of the entire book in just a few short words? I won’t lie—it’s tricky. This article will look at how to come up with a title that will suit your novel and engage your readers. Asking around, the piece of advice I heard the most was, ‘It will strike you like a bolt of lightning. Suddenly, you will just know!’ I got this advice from readers, not authors. I took this approach when trying to name my first novel, Birth By Fire’s Embrace. It was well after I had finished the novel and started the editing process that I realised it wasn’t that easy to pick a title. It wasn’t going to drop out of the sky in front of me. A good title needs work, patience, and a lot of thought put into it. I wrestled with titles for weeks before I finally settled on Birth by Fire’s Embrace. About a month after finishing Birth by Fire’s Embrace, I started to work on its sequel. I was typing away at home one night when I paused. It had just hit me: the title. After painful weeks wracking my brain for the first novel’s title, the second one was developed in a matter of seconds. I finished that novel with a smile as, for me, the hardest part was already done. To create a good title, you really need to get a comprehensive feel for your novel. The title needs to reflect the vibe of the book. But remember, there are always two sides to the coin. Let’s take a look at some popular examples. Example one: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling. The main character’s name is Harry Potter, and the story is about the Chamber of Secrets. Nice and simple. It tells the readers what they want to know, but still retains enough mystery to interest them in reading it. It’s a straightforward title, following the style in which the novel is written. Example two: Twilight by Stephanie Meyer. Short and extremely mysterious, it suggests nothing, but allows the mind to explore possibilities. Both titles are great...

Read More

Interview with Mike Klumpp

Interview with Mike Klumpp

by Joy Anne Shearer SPMG author Mike Klumpp recently published I Am: The Miracle, an insightful memoir of his experiences in Africa and how his faith grew during his time there. I Am: The Miracle  is an inspiring read and a great holiday gift. Now you can give twice: for each book purchased, $1 will be donated to victims of Typhoon Haiyan! Get your copies here: http://www.amazon.com/I-Am-Miracle-Mike-Klumpp/dp/1938444043 . Mr. Klumpp was kind enough to answer some questions for us so we could peek at his writing life, marketing style, and more. Besides writing, what other work do you enjoy? I have worked for two reasons in my life; one, because it allowed me to write, two, because I was working at the very thing I loved. Currently, I work teaching in a school in Hong Kong, I pastor a small church, I work with the homeless in the Philippines and Kenya and I train in the martial arts. I enjoy helping people; seeing a smile where there was no hope. What type of music do you listen to? I listen to an eclectic folk rock jazz blues and classical mix. Paul Thorn, Ray Willie Hubbard, and Matt the Electrician are at the top of the list the last few weeks. Before that Arvo Part, Bootsie Collins, and Mike Doughty were at the top of the pack. What is your favorite motivational phrase? Esse quam videri. To be rather than to seem. What advice would you give aspiring writers? Keep writing – strive for honesty and transparency – write about what you know – trust your instincts but be willing to live with the results – learn to be a team player – never cease to get educated Who is your favorite author and why? Wow – this is tough. I would have to say William Kotzwinkle. His books are profoundly funny and yet rip the cover off of modern culture. Next would be Kerouac for his honesty or Nicolas Gogol for his beautiful exposing of human nature in Dead Souls. Name a book, or a few books that have had an influence on you and your writing. Dharma Bums by Kerouac, Cat’s Cradle by Vonnegut, Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole, Love in the Ruins, Walker Percy and The Fan Man by William Kotzwinkle, These books are among the most influential in my writing though in a memoir like I Am:The Miracle it may be less evident than in my fiction. Why do you write? I write because I always have. When I was young I was told by my parents to be seen and not heard. I would sit alone in a room in our home filled...

Read More
%d bloggers like this: