New Release – The Unconventional Dwarf

New Release – The Unconventional Dwarf

The Unconventional Dwarf The Unconventional Dwarf is the first book in the series, and it takes a hard look at one of the most pigeonholed races in Fantasy. In addition to exploring the roots of the “conventional” dwarf, this book will present you with a range of original Dwarven races and cultures that are radically different and yet all retain something basically Dwarven. Inside you will discover: The Nanogyn, a network of matriarchal tribes that broke away from male-dominated Dwarven culture and are now feared for their prowess. Thalassic Dwarves, island-dwellers who have mastered the art of cave diving and possess the secret of breathing water. The Mono, a deeply divided Dwarven culture built upon physical perfection, philosophical rationalism, and belief in their own superiority The Anma Namdi’me, spacefaring and shape-changingDwarves, and their dark mirror, the Ib’zur Makim The Pumili: a great empire that has conquered most of humankind with combination of trade, negotiation, and Romanesque military might Hive Dwarves: did you know that Dwarves use spades, not axes? do you know why they sometimes forget to wear pants? you will… The Gamda: a diasporic people with a rich mystical tradition that takes the influence mediaeval Hasidic and Kabbalistic Judaism had on Tolkien and makes it explicit The Novus: short-lived Dwarves with a culture of ever-shifting fashions driven by an obsession with adventure and glory Available Now through DriveThru RPG here!  Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

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Get Your Holiday List Started Here!

Get Your Holiday List Started Here!

By Judy Spring The holiday season is upon us. It’s time for crisp winter air, warm fires, and visiting with family. It’s also time to begin to shop for your holiday gift lists. A simple and thoughtful way to get started is to shop for the bookworms in your life, and we have some suggestions for all of your differing needs. For fantasy lovers of all ages, we offer Birth by Fire’s Embrace by Ashleigh Galvin. “When all that is familiar vanishes from Shar’s life, she begins to look inside and find the strength and courage to carry on in a harsh world, and look towards another world that lies ahead.” To find purchasing information and to learn more about Birth by Fire’s Embrace, visit Ashleigh Galvin’s website at: http://ashleighgalvin.wordpress.com/. Try a romantic mystery for the mysterious types in your life! Twist of Fate, by Genilee Swope Parente and F. Sharon Swope is the first in a series chronicling Detective Sam Osborne as he ferrets out clues to help the young heiress Casey Lewis discover who is out to take her life. Discover love, companionship, and a good mystery to tie up all the characters in a simple Twist of Fate. Be sure to include the second book in the series, Wretched Fate, to round out the gifts you give your mystery lover. Twist of Fate can be purchased on Amazon here, and Wretched Fate is currently available through Amazon here. If you’d like to learn more about this writing duo, check out their website at http://swopeparente.com/. Next up, we invite you have a look at the young adult fantasy novel Heron’s Path by Alethea Eason. This book is perfect for your young adult that likes to adventure into other worlds. Join two sisters, Katy and Celeste, as “Like the current of the river Talum that witnesses all within these pages, you too will be swept along in the adventure, sometimes in reflective pools, sometimes drawn inexorably to the falls… to find the Heron’s Path.” Heron’s Path can be found on Amazon here, and you can learn more about Alethea and the novel on her website at http://theheronspath.com/. For those drawn to inspirational writings, try Mike Klumpp’s I Am: The Miracle. Klumpp shares his journey in this Christian inspirational memoir, spreading across the continent and into other countries. Bits of poetry and anecdotes highlight Mike’s faith and perseverance as he finds his purpose in life. From the listing on Amazon: “This book serves to further support those in need as proceeds will go directly towards efforts to help the underprivileged in various groups overseas. This is managed through Mike’s charity, the East African Service and Empowerment Organization (EASE: http://easeorg.com), which...

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Revision: Beta Readers

Revision: Beta Readers

by Nicole Galloway-Miller Beta readers are an essential part of the revision process. They are readers who volunteer to read a piece of writing and offer criticism on it. Sometimes there is an exchange. They agree to read a piece of work if the writer of that work agrees to read a piece of their work. The term beta comes from the software industry, which uses “beta” to describe an imperfect release. The release is used by beta testers who try to identify problems before it is released to the general public. These testers deliberately attempt to break the software looking for points of weakness which could pose problems. Beta readers for a piece of writing provide a similar service to the writer searching for weaknesses in a piece. Ideal beta readers are opinionated and willing to express those opinions without killing an author’s hopes and dreams. They are passionate about quality writing and storytelling and willing to collaborate and share their knowledge with others. Beware, though, friends and family often do not make good beta readers. If a beta reader is too close to the writer, he or she may not feel that they can say difficult things or negative opinions about the piece of writing and feel comfortable offering criticism about weaknesses of a piece, which is essential to this process. Most beta readers read regularly. They prefer to read broadly and do not restrict themselves to one genre or type of novel. Ideally, they read a variety of popular fiction and literary works and are not “book snobs” who prefer impenetrable literature. Very often they are writers themselves, because fellow writers understand the challenges of creating a book-length manuscript and what makes a good book. Great beta readers are knowledgeable about the publishing world and have good instincts about what it takes to get a book noticed by a literary agent or book buyer. A good beta reader will be able to identify weaknesses in characterization and plot which the writer has missed. In addition, the beta reader will proofread the work for typos and grammatical errors. Many authors use several beta readers to solicit a wider opinion of the work as a whole. When choosing beta readers for your manuscript, make sure that at least one of them has an editorial or proofreading background and that one or two of the others is in the target audience in terms of age, gender and interests. If your book is about a character with special knowledge such as a golfer or detective, try to include a reader who is golfer or detective or knows a lot about the subject. This way, you can double-check your facts. The...

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Armand Sabatier ~ Sidekick or Assassin?

Armand Sabatier ~ Sidekick or Assassin?

by Roland Clarke English: Rancocas (Helis Stock) Farm is an American thoroughbred horse racing stud farm and racing stable located on Monmouth Road (County Road 537) in Springfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey, Jobstown, New Jersey. As the winter snows threaten, I need to draw my interviews at Du Noroît Stud to a close. Arranging the final interviews has been a challenge—as head groom, Odette Fedon has a schedule that seems like 24/7, while I was beginning to feel that Armand Sabatier was as evasive as a wolf. Is that why he’s called Loup, French for wolf? However, he has finally agreed to talk on the understanding that he has the right to remain silent. Bonjour Armand. Many thanks for agreeing to talk about yourself. First, what was your life like growing up in France? My childhood will always be a precious memory, even if life was hard for mes parents with four children. Our farm in the Cevennes provided more than enough to feed us well: l’agneau—the lamb, vegetables, and les châtaignes—chestnuts that my mother even used for bread. The region is beautiful, especially in the autumn with the trees. But it’s all no more. Just memories. What went wrong? Did your parents lose the farm? Non, but to see us educated they had to take other work and rent out the farm, as it wouldn’t sell. Now they live in Montpelier, je pense. My older brother, Laurent lives there but the rest of us…moved away. This is all before ‘Spiral of Hooves’ begins? What made you leave? Back in my teens, I dreamt of helping the environment by finding safer ways of doing things in the Cevennes. I managed to get degrees in Biodiversity, Ecology, and Evolution at the University of Montpelier, but then I…changed…careers. A change of direction? In what way? A positive one, I hope. Merde, je souffre. It hurts to remember. Just know that I failed badly, and betrayed the trust of my closest friends. The price was too high. Even now the guilt is too much…but I had to run. I still pay for mon erreur. You came here to escape? Or to build a new future? Especially in the fall, this area reminds me of the home I abandoned. And my past is…buried. Gilles has given me a chance of…something better. Here my degree was a means to move on. Is that why your new friends see you as a bookworm? You misunderstand. The books and my qualifications are the future. Here I can forget…and move on. But Roman Boissard believes that “the scruffy academic is a born criminal” because of your evasive manner. He wants your “contract terminated”. Yet, the others...

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Resurrecting Dead Ideas

Resurrecting Dead Ideas

by Yen Ooi Do you have story ideas that you have forgotten, left for dead, given up on, or worse, ignored? Well, why not take this spooky Halloween season to resurrect them? Perhaps they could be revived for a dramatic entrance as a new novel this NaNoWriMo? As a writer, I have notes in many formats, but thankfully, I’ve learnt to keep them all in one of two places; my computer, or my notebook. I don’t think that this is the best method, but it works for me. What methods do you use for note-keeping? Do you keep everything that you think would inspire a story someday? Being a writer is an ongoing learning process for me. I am always doubting what I should write down, and what I should just throw away, but I’m glad that I generally decide to keep most of my ideas. It can be anything from a word to an actual scene, or even a breakdown of a storyline. Sometimes, when I am feeling uninspired or just needing a kick up my creative backside, I pull out my notes and read through them as something would always jump out of the page and scream ‘write me’. Don’t be afraid to be different. Writers have their own quirks, which can be seen in this brilliant compilation of writers’ notebooks. http://www.jackiemorris.co.uk/blog/writers-notebooks/ Every story begins differently; some small, some large, some complete, some making no sense at all. Every story also has a different incubation period. It might take years to mature into an actual story, or it might take minutes from inception. Stories cannot be rushed and need to be worked with at their own pace. Earlier this year, I looked at my old notes and found just a short description of a young man whom I saw working at a Starbucks near where I had lived in Tokyo. I had written the description in 2008, wanting just a memory of that moment that might somehow be inspired into a story. I had looked at the same note various times in the last five years, but nothing came to it, until sometime earlier this year, when the idea for a short story came to me. I knew then, that my Starbucks boy will be written into a story and that was how the story of the same title was born. So, how will you react to your old notes and ideas? Do you think there’s something there that is screaming to be written soon? Don’t throw out old ideas, or ignore them. Keep them in a safe place where you can refer to them periodically. You’ll find that they each have a moment in which to shine in...

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