2b or Not 2b: The Poetry of Numbers

2b or Not 2b: The Poetry of Numbers

That’s right, folks. We are heralding our newest addition to the Spectacle family with a truly imaginative oddball: “Poetry for Engineers.” Each page meticulously written out on a typewriter and then scanned into digital format, engineer/author Clayton T. Grow, P.E. creates a masterful book of mathematical art. The combination of his quaint, sometimes white-out corrected pages and the precision of his wordsmithing create a delightful work that will engage the left brained and right brained alike. Written with an eye towards engineers, mathematicians and other logic-oriented experts, Mr. Grow is able to forge poetry that bridges the communication barrier to appeal to number wizards and the non-mathematical, alike. A truly captivating book, “Poetry for Engineers” is a must-have for every lover of poetry. For more information on Mr. Grow, check out his blogs: The Writing Engineer Poet for Hire Welcome to Clay Town Also, be sure to check back soon for a link to “Poetry for Engineers.” You won’t want to miss out! Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

Read More

A Game of Tropes

A Game of Tropes

A literary trope is a figurative or symbolic metaphor in its most complicated sense. In its more homogenized definition, a trope is a technique or stereotype that uses commonly established archetypes to help convey meaning.  In all stories, we know that the Hero is special. He’s the Chosen One, who will affect change in his world; this one of the most common tropes in genre fiction. Another example would be the “evil galactic empire” reminiscent of Nazis, Romans, Fascists. They sport gray uniforms, and appear in Star Wars, Star Trek, Firefly, Chronicles of Riddick, and a dozen others. In these pieces the “good guys” are always diverse and colorful—this is a metaphor or trope for an idealized way of life slathered in diversity and personal freedoms. Consider: In Star Wars rebel pilots wear bright orange—their enemy counterparts look like SS soldiers. In Lord of the Rings, the heroes armies gather with brightly colored banners of silver and gold, blue and green. The orcs mass under a variants of a black flag. An interesting use of this trope is Robert Heinlein’s StarShip Troopers. The narrator is, in fact, one of those gray-uniform wearing space-nazis. Though we are sympathetic to this character, there can be no doubt that he is from a less than democratic society—this causes a gut reaction in most Americans. Everyone around me is gearing up for the next season of Game of Thrones. While watching/reading, I see elements from many other very successful authors in variety of genres. One cannot help but wonder is George R. R. Martin a singular fantasy genius or simply a well read nerd? Neither is really a bad thing, but I want to point some of the methods he’s using to bring standard fantasy tropes to life in new ways. I may go so far as to say that nothing in the Game of Thrones series is new or the sole creation of George’s imagination. That’s okay. I once had a writing professor offer the quotation, “Young writers invent, published writers steal.” He was not of course encouraging plagiarism, nor am I suggesting George R.R. Martin is guilty of this most heinous of crimes. I am saying the George R.R. Martin has brilliantly woven in commonly loved cultural elements from a myriad of fiction sources, made them his own and taken us on a great ride. First let’s address some of the standard tropes within the genre of fantasy literature. The one that always gets my goat is the chosen one. How many Chosen One’s can there be? It is important that we understand the necessity of this element, but also that it is as old as the concept of the story...

Read More

Friday the 13th

Walking under ladders. Black cats. Open umbrellas indoors. A mirror falls and crashes. Stepping on cracks in the sidewalk. And let’s not forget, it’s Friday the Thirteenth. Sure, lots of people have their own superstitions, but what about writers? Many writers feel their surrounding environment must be a certain way in order to release the creative muse. Some writers prefer quiet, sparse and hidden spaces. Others can’t write without that one little plastic soldier standing guard at their desk, facing the south. When it comes to writing spaces and routines, there is no one-size-fits all or ultimate answer. Each author’s writing routine is as varied and unique as the writer who chooses it. Does that make these habits… weird? Maybe. But a little bit of writing-scripts-while-obsessively-listening-to-the-Inception-soundtrack-on-repeat may not be all that bad for the writing process. Having a safe, comfortable environment that balances stimulation and the banal may just be what your brain craves. But if that black cat just happens to knock your little plastic soldier off the desk onto an umbrella setting it off into a mirror which shatters pieces under a ladder, don’t dismay. This tiny bit of chaos or break from your normal routine may stimulate your brain to work in details it to which it wouldn’t have been privy otherwise. Just remember, a little break from routine doesn’t have to be the end of the world. And speaking of the end of the world, did you know that our deadline for submissions has changed? That’s right, we are looking for YOUR 2012 doomsday short story. So send us one, today! Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

Read More

Spectacle: Who We Are

[youtube:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=simDWTHUZN0&context=C359b4faADOEgsToPDskLPUhmzPBBoUlLpYYRLFBh5] Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

Read More

But wait, there’s more!

I have fantastic news for those of you dreading a return to the doldrums of every day life as this holiday season comes to a close. The twelfth day of Christmas isn’t until January 6th. That is when a very special (and in some countries, a quite epic) celebration called El Dia de Los Reyes takes place. Known in English as Three Kings’ Day or The Feast of the Epiphany, this is a holiday steeped in traditions, stories, music, culture and presents. Did I mention presents? In honor of El Dia de Los Reyes, Spectacle is offering a very special bilingual children’s book called “La Caja Basia/ The Empty Box.” This book features hand-drawn illustrations by Freddy Sanchez with a Spanish storyline by Maria Goretti Sanchez, translated into English by me. A labor of love, come see what Manuel and Maria are up to this Dia de Los Reyes and join in the magic from my family to yours. Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

Read More
%d bloggers like this: