The Apocalypse Has Arrived…

The Apocalypse Has Arrived…

The makers of the sensational new RPG, “The Darkest Age” are now giving you a chance at the helm. We are now accepting submissions for original, well written short stories focusing on the end of the world. We are looking for 2500 to 5000 words of fiction about the end of times. We’re talking major apocalypse here. Winner takes $100. Deadline is September 15th and entries must be emailed as an attached .doc file to submissions@spectaclepmg.com Entries must be original and unpublished. If your story is accepted for publication in our anthology, “Omega,” you will receive a complimentary copy of the ebook. Did I mention that first prize is a hundred buckaroos? So stop reading this and get to writing, my friends! Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

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Wizard World Chicago

Wizard World Chicago

Spectacle Publishing at Wizard World Did you see us? We saw you! The Madison Spectacle Publishing team was in Chicago for the 2012 Wizard World event. In addition to great costumes, excellent shopping and junk food galore, the SPMG team talked about their first Role-Playing Game release, The Darkest Age.   “In 1354 the Black Plague killed 25 million people. Then they stood up and fed upon the living.” Written by veteran game designer, Rob Gee and science-fiction fantasy author, Eric Staggs, with art from Jeff Dewitt (among other fantastic illustrators), The Darkest Age is a d20-based role-playing game. The Darkest Age is set in 1345, during the height of the Black Plague. The Darkest Age role-playing game takes the zombie apocalypse into a brilliantly plausible and well-researched alternate history. To learn more about The Darkest Age, check out the website or like it on Facebook. The Names and The Faces Wizard World was packed to bursting with famous folks, icons of nerddom and geekness of unrivaled proportion. The Spectacle Publishing team got their pictures taken with the beautiful Cindy Morgan of Tron. Not to mention meeting the great Clyde Caldwell and a slew of other talented artists too numerous to name. But take heart, they’ve been “liked” on our Facebook page. Missed Spectacle at Wizard World? That’s too bad, but you’ll have another chance. The Spectacle Publishing team located in Madison Wisconsin will be at WisCon 2013. Never been to WisCon? Check it out! It’s the nation’s first Feminist Science-Fiction and Fantasy convention. We’ll be there showcasing books from our up and coming female authors, Alethea Eason (The Heron’s Path), Ashleigh Gavin (Birth by Fire’s Embrace) and of course we’ll have copies of The Darkest Age. See you there!     Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

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R.I.P. Gore Vidal

R.I.P. Gore Vidal

Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

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Bronies, Writing and You

Bronies, Writing and You

Today’s topic is the magic of friendship. Alright, maybe not, but as many corners of the internet can attest there has been a rising resurgence of ponies. In fact, fans of both genders worldwide have gone diligently to work reproducing and remixing pony art, pony sites and pony videos. This massive herd has everypony *ahem* I mean, everybody doing something that is both wonderful and ‘illegal,’ However, Lauren Faust, the creator of the most recent generation of ‘My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic’ embraces the borrowing and retooling of her work. The result has been a creative outburst of epic proportions. Collaboration. Respect. Creativity. Imagination. In today’s artistic world there has been a heated debate over who owns the content that many of us are generating by the billions each day. Few are able to articulate this better than Harvard professor Larry Lessig: [youtube:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Q25-S7jzgs] Teamwork is a beautiful thing and can have extraordinary, far-reaching results. Be respectful of artists of all kinds; always point back to the source once you’ve gained permission to use something. Perhaps most importantly, don’t forget to make original work of your own that others can mishmash to their hearts’ content.   Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Like this:Like...

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Villains: The Psychopath or Sociopath

Villains: The Psychopath or Sociopath

By: Nicole Galloway-Miller No matter the genre, every story needs an antagonist, a character who works against the hero or heroine and thwarts his or her every move. When writing a villain, it is easy to turn to the tried and true clichés of evil in-laws, serial killers, and stalkers. These types of characters make excellent villains. When creating a realistic antagonist, an author must consider the character’s primary motivation. What separate mediocre villains from memorable ones is the reason the antagonist desires power, prestige or revenge. Oftentimes these goals are the result of mental illness. Psychology is a great resource for exploring the motivations of criminals. As a writer, being familiar with some common personality disorders and how they manifest is extremely beneficial. This information can be a big help during the characterization process. One of the most common diagnoses is Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD), the psychopaths and sociopaths of the world. Symptoms of this mental illness include irritability, impulsivity, deception and a blatant disregard for social norms. Often people with this diagnosis are aggressive and do not feel remorseful or guilty. They have above-average intelligence and a wide variety of talents. When creating a villain with this disorder, it is important to remember that they exhibit these symptoms from an early age. In fact, many were juvenile delinquents. Psychologists disagree about the number of types of ASPD. Since the symptoms manifest themselves in many different ways, there is plenty of fodder for inspiration. Most sociopaths exhibit Jekyll and Hyde characteristics. On the surface, they are charming and pleasant. Underneath this façade lurks their true nature, aggressive and violent. Driven by a lust for control, attention, power and money, they are expert manipulators and can often get large groups of people to do what they want. Their ultimate weakness is that eventually these psychopaths can no longer maintain the act and turn violent and abusive. Sometimes the focus of their destructive tendencies is companionship. Aware that most people are tortured by doubt, guilt and inhibitions, sociopathic individuals create a relaxing, pleasant and safe environment. They tell them their partners, want those people want to hear and appear interested in their likes and dislikes. After some time, their true nature emerges. The psychopath becomes violent and abusive, lashes out at their significant others and shatters the peaceful environment. In other sociopaths, they are social and friendly in public and at home. Once at home, these individuals turn into monsters, abuse their families, and close friends. Since most people with ASPD are suspicious and paranoid, psychopaths may bully and antagonize coworkers they see as threats. Even when on their best behavior, sociopaths are unreliable, impulsive and moody. They often nurse...

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